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Balanced Living, Plant Based

Beat Joint Pain With These Fast and Easy Tips

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by St. Francis

Are you one of the many people who suffer from chronic joint pain? Painful joints from arthritis, injuries, or sprains and strains affect a wide portion of adults and can make daily movement difficult, whether the pain is chronic or acute. Living with painful joints makes you wish for quick relief, and while over-the-counter medication might temporarily relieve pain, relying on painkillers alone is no holistic pain relief strategy. So what else can you do to ease painful joints? Find our favorite tips below.

What causes joint pain?

Joint pain commonly affects the knees, hips, shoulders, and back. It can be caused by normal wear-and-tear from the breakdown of cartilage between the joints and bones, but overuse – from repetitive movement or poor posture – and injury are also common culprits when it comes to joint pain. No matter the cause, you'll want to find ways to relieve the pain so you can go about your days and enjoy life, pain-free. 

Picture of people doing yoga on the sand at the beach

What's wrong with painkillers and over-the-counter medication for joint pain?

Over-the-counter pain medication are meant for short-term relief only, such as for relieving an occasional headache. Relying on painkillers in the long-term to assist with joint pain can negatively affect your health – namely your liver and kidneys, while increasing risk of heart attack, stroke, and stomach ulcers. But here's the great news: try the tips below for fast and easy (and healthy!) joint pain relief, naturally. 

Try hot and cold therapy

Address pain and swelling with hot and cold packs. Try heat pads or a warm bath to soothe stiffness. Alternatively, ice packs or cold compresses help dull pain and reduce inflammation.

Mindful movement

Picture of woman sitting grass in front of woods meditating

Exercising might be the last thing in your mind when you're dealing with pain, but mindful movement and stretching can work wonders for pain relief. Try swimming, cycling, or other low-impact exercises such as restorative yoga.

Inflammation-fighting foods

Load up on Omega-3 fatty acids, antioxidant-rich fruits and vegetables, collagen from slow-simmered bone broth, and anti-inflammatory herbs like turmeric and ginger to fight joint pain with food.

Topical, targeted pain relief

Topical painkillers applied on the affected area provide quick relief. Try our Kinomai Cream with analgesic capsaicin from cayenne, effective for the relief of joint-related aches and pains from backache, lumbago, strains and sprains, and arthritis.

For more information on joint pain look at our blog on Curcumin Plus.

Have questions? Just visit our Great Questions Answered page to learn more or to submit a question.

Kinomai® Cream Cayenne

Ingredients

Certified Organic Olive Oil
Frankincense (Boswellia sacra)
Meadowsweet (Spiraea ulmaria)
Mullein
Salix alba
Sunflower (Helianthus annuus)

Certified Organic Olive Oil

Rich in phytonutrient compounds, olive oil is the centrepiece of a healthful Mediterranean diet, which has been conclusively correlated with a lower incidence of a remarkably broad range of diseases.

Frankincense (Boswellia sacra)

Recent studies have indicated that frankincense tree populations are declining due to overexploitation. Heavily tapped trees have been found to produce seeds that germinate at only 16%, while seeds of trees that have not been tapped germinate at more than 80%. Animals in Oman often browse on the tree's foliage, flowers, and seedlings, resulting in scant regeneration; the mature trees that remain are apparently dying.

Meadowsweet (Spiraea ulmaria)

The whole herb possesses a pleasant taste and flavour, the green parts having a similar aromatic character to the flowers, which led to the plant’s use as a strewing herb on floors, to give rooms a pleasant aroma, and also as a flavouring agent in wine, beer, and many vinegars. The flowers can be added to stewed fruit and jams, giving them a subtle almond flavor. Meadowsweet has many medicinal properties. The whole plant is a traditional remedy for an acidic stomach, and the fresh root is often used in negligible quantities in homeopathic preparations. Dried, the flowers are used in potpourri. It is also a frequently used spice in Scandinavian varieties of mead. Chemical constituents include salicylic acid, flavone glycosides, essential oils, and tannins.

Mullein

A tall plant with a stem that rises to a spike characterized by small yellow flowers, mullein grows in well-lit, disturbed soils throughout the temperate zones of Europe and Asia, as well as North America.

Salix alba

Hippocrates, Galen, Pliny the Elder and others knew willow bark could ease aches and pains and reduce fevers. It has long been used in Europe and China for the treatment of these conditions. This remedy is also mentioned in texts from ancient Egypt, Sumer, and Assyria. The first "clinical trial" was reported by Reverend Edward Stone, a vicar from Chipping Norton in Oxfordshire, England, in 1763 with a successful treatment of malarial fever with the willow bark. The bark is often macerated in ethanol to produce a tincture. The active extract of the bark, called salicin, after the Latin name Salix, was isolated to its crystalline form in 1828 by Henri Leroux, a French pharmacist, and Raffaele Piria, an Italian chemist, who then succeeded in separating out the acid in its pure state. Salicylic acid, like aspirin, is a chemical derivative of salicin.

Sunflower (Helianthus annuus)

One of the major threats that sunflowers face today is Fusarium, a filamentous fungus that is found largely in soil and plants. It is a pathogen that over the years has caused an increasing amount of damage and loss of sunflower crops, sometimes as extensive as 80 percent of damaged crops. Downy mildew is another disease to which sunflowers are susceptible. Their susceptibility to downy mildew is particularly high due to the sunflower's way of growth and development. Sunflower seeds are generally planted only an inch deep in the ground. When such shallow planting is done in moist and soaked earth or soil, it increases the chances of diseases such as downy mildew. Another major threat to sunflower crops is broomrape, a parasite that attacks the root of the sunflower and causes extensive damage to sunflower crops, as high as 100 percent.

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Author: St. Francis

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